CANADIAN FASHION ORGANISATIONS

Introducing the new archival section “CANADIAN FASHION ORGANISATIONS”
.
There have been many organisations developed to promote CANADIAN FASHION DESIGNERS.
I have posted information from several of these (catalogues and clippings etc.) in the past.
Putting some sort of order (archivists like myself thrive on order, and the minutiae, the who, what, where, when, why) to this has been tricky.
HUGE THANKS to NORMA MENEGUZZI SPALL, for sharing her information, anecdotes, and personal reflections.
Norma’s list is the backbone and catalyst to this new section.

If anyone else has more info, and I know you do, please (and yes I know I am whining, but I know there is so much amazing stuff to add), let me know…

mid 1970’s
FASHION DESIGNERS ASSOCIATION OF CANADA / (FDAC)
Represented 24 of Canada’s top designers including names such as LEO CHEVALIER, MICHEL ROBICHAUD, ROBERT CHERNIN, JOHN WARDEN, CHRISTOPHER RYAN, GABRIEL LEVY, MARILYN BROOKS, WAYNE CLARK, LINDA LUNDSTROM, etc.

FASHION CANADA,
A department of the Ministry of Industry, Trade and Tourism, who provided partial funding
LISA TAYLOR headed up FASHION CANADA and MARY STEPHENSON was the Executive Director of the FDAC
For a time, the FDAC was based in Montreal which is where Mary lived. And then in Toronto when Mary moved to Toronto

FDAC TREND SHOWS
Held two times a year – Spring/Summer and Fall/Winter.
The shows were held in hotel ballrooms and featured capsule Collections from the designers.
The Trend Shows were ‘the’ fashion event to attend. The Shows were shown in Toronto and Montreal.
LEO CHEVALIER was the President of the FDAC.ROBERT CHERNIN later took on the role.

In 1974, I (NORMA) was working for a public relations company called Infoplan. Our client, Borateem Plus, began to work with some of the designers such as PAT MCDONAGH and MARILYN BROOKS in doing education media junkets to promote these designer fashions and Borateem Plus. In 1975, the client wanted a consumer-oriented show to be developed and my role was to find women’s focused charitable groups in major cities who would be interested in undertaking local ticket sales and the sourcing of venues. All proceeds would benefit their cause. It was quite an undertaking but at the time these charities were excited to take on the task. We then worked with FDAC in taking their Spring/Summer Collection to major cities across Canada. The show was called CANADIAN DESIGNER SHOWCASE and we initially went to 10 cities over three weeks. By the time I left Infoplan in 1979, we were going to 30 cities over 6 weeks. It was a two-hour show that became co-sponsored by Air Canada. We travelled as a group of eleven including MARY STEPHENSON. We got tremendous publicity for Canadian fashion and CANADIAN DESIGNER SHOWCASE was instrumental in raising awareness for Canadian designers outside of Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto.

The last CANDIAN DESIGNER SHOWCASE was around 1979/1980 and the FDAC, I believe, also disbanded at around that time

1980s
TORONTO ONTARIO DESIGNERS (TOD).
Toronto designers MARILYN BROOKS, PAT MCDONAGH, WAYNE CLARK and LINDA LUNDSTROM were instrumental in its start-up.
These designers wanted to make sure that there a formal designer group existed to help promote their Collections

1985
FESTIVAL OF CANADIAN FASHION
The FESTIVAL was STEVEN LEVY’S (ONE OF A KIND SHOWS) brainchild and it took the City by storm opening the event to both trade and consumer audiences
For several years the fashion show was the one to be in and to see.
FESTIVAL OF CANADIAN FASHION was later sold to the City of Toronto

Montreal designers were also banding together and securing provincial funding for their own fashion events. For many years, there was a competition between Montreal and Toronto as to which city was Canada’s fashion capitol.

1984
FASHION INDUSTRY LIASON COMMITTEE
FILC was a division of Toronto’s Economic Development Office.

1986
THE TORONTO FASHION INCUBATOR (TFI)
Formed by the FASHION INDUSTRY LIASON COMMITTEE.

1990
TORONTO FASHION WEEK
The City of Toronto, through FILC, started this week to support the Toronto fashion community and Toronto fashion retailers.

early 1990’s
DESIGNERS ONTARIO
Started in the by BRIAN BAILEY and CAROL OUTRAM with support from the City of Toronto and the government of Ontario.
DESIGNERS ONTARIO showed Ready-to-Wear Collection Shows twice a year.
Designers from Toronto and Montreal participated.
Each designer paid to participate in the shows.
The shows took place in hotel ballrooms throughout the city.

1992
MATINEE FASHION FOUNDATION(MFF)
Matinée (Imperial Tobacco cigarette brand) formed the MATINEE FASHION FOUNDATION(MFF).
The mandate of the MFF was to support Canadian fashion designers by providing grants to help grow their businesses.
In return, the designers receiving grants agreed to promote MFF through hang tags as well as participate in an annual MFF show which toured to three or four major cities in Canada.
Matinee also heavily advertised their grantees in consumer magazines, transit shelter advertising, etc.
The MFF was instrumental in helping major designers such as WAYNE CLARK, PAT MCDONAGH, FRANCO MIRABELLI, BRIAN BAILEY, DAVID DIXON, etc. to grow their businesses.
The MFF would also sponsor breakfasts or the media room at the DESIGNERS ONTARIO READY-TO-WEAR COLLECTIONS shows.

The recession of the early 1990s was brutal and affected the apparel industry considerably. By 1995/1996, Designers Ontario was barely surviving. Government funding for the shows was dwindling as was support/participation from designers. It was simply becoming too expensive for the designers to bear the costs of showing their Collections. At the end of 1996, FRANCO MIRABELLI was named President of DESIGNERS ONTARIO. He and BRIAN BAILEY met to discuss how to keep DESIGNERS ONTARIO afloat and to save the Ready-to-Wear Collections. They went to Matinée and proposed that they become the title sponsor of the Ready-to-Wear collections. Matinee was reluctant to become the sponsor as they already had their own shows to promote the designers they were supporting. Brian and Franco were very persuasive

March 25th 1997
THE MATINEE FASHION READY-TO-WEAR
Participating designers came from Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal.

On January 27 1997, I was hired as the Event Producer for the first ever MATINEE FASHION READY-TO-WEAR. I had six weeks to pull together a team of people to produce the show as the show was to take place over two days from March 25 to 26 1997. CRYSTAL SIEMENS, FRANCO MIRABELLI, MARILYN BROOKS, and BRIAN BAILEY were the key designers providing support behind the scenes. However, there was much too do including: finding a venue, finding other sponsors (Matinee’s support did not pay for the entire show), finding other designers (18 in total); design and printing of the program, lighting and staging, choreographer, music, etc. etc. It was madness for six weeks but the team pulled it off and on March 25th the MATINEE FASHION READY-TO-WEAR to a full house of media, fashion influencers and retailers at the Masonic Temple on Yonge Street. Everyone knew that Matinée was the white knight saving the day for the Collection shows and in the opening ceremonies, they were given a standing ovation.

In April 1997, I (Norma) was named the new Executive Director of DESIGNERS ONTARIO reporting to FRANCO MIRABELLI who was the President of the Board. One of the first things we did was to introduce non-designers to the Board of Designers Ontario. We brought in fashion influencers such as BERT DEVEAU, Visual Merchandiser at The Bay, RICHARD LOCKHART, Buyer at The Bay, DEBORAH FULSANG, Flare Magazine, JANE HARVEY, lawyer, Jane Harvey and Associates.

Designers on the Board included CRYSTAL SIEMENS, DAVID DIXON, ROSS MAYER, BRIAN BAILEY, MARILYN BROOKS, FRANCO MIRABELLI (PRESIDENT) and ROBIN KAY. Participation in the MFRTW was done by jury selection.
Other sponsors of the show included Mac Cosmetics, Schwartzkopf ProfessionaL. VISA Canada, The Eaton Centre, FASHION Magazine, Bell Mobility, Perrier, Phantom Hosiery, Town Shoes, etc.
In September 1997 MFRTW moved to The Docks where it continued to be held until March 1999. In addition to supporting the Ready-to-Wear, Matinee also ran a consumer advertising campaign to promote the Ready-to-Wear in Toronto.
This would have been the very first time, a sponsor backed the Ready-to-Wear in such a way.
The last show always belonged to the Matinee Fashion Foundation.
Consumer tickets were sold and the show was followed by an ‘after-party’.

My last show was March 1999 and I left DESIGNERS ONTARIO in June 1999. Shortly afterwards, I was named to the Board of the MATINEE FASHION FOUNDATION. Pending government regulations banning tobacco company advertising and sponsorship of events was looming. Matinee’s last sponsorship of the Ready-to-Wear Collections was September 1999. The Matinee Fashion Foundation shut down around 2001/2002. In September 1999, the last MFRTW took place under the tents on a Cumberland Avenue parking lot. Torrential rain with gale force winds almost toppled the tents but the show went on with a few behind-the-scene calamities due to the storm! Media was becoming disenchanted with a cigarette company sponsoring the shows and resultant press was often not complimentary.

2000
DESIGNERS ONTARIO went back to the lean years and struggled to figure out how to continue the momentum created by Matinee’s support of the designer Collections
MARILYN BROOKS took over as President of the Board and worked tirelessly to ensure that some semblance of show was produced for March 2000.
With ROBIN KAY’S support, they managed to secure support from the Windsor Arms Hotel and a smaller presentation of a few designers took place in March 2000

2002
FASHION DESIGN COUNCIL OF CANADA
ROBIN KAY and MARILYN BROOKS were the founders of the FASHION DESIGN COUNCIL OF CANADA.
ROBIN KAY became the President of the FDCC
The Windsor Arms was the home for the shows.

January 2002
L’OREAL PROFESSIONAL PRESENTS TORONTO FASHION WEEK
L’OREAL PROFESSIONAL announced that they would become the title sponsor of TORONTO FASHION WEEK.
The first-ever L’OREAL PROFESSIONAL PRESENTS TORONTO FASHION WEEK took place at The Liberty Grand in March 2002.
L’Oreal remained the title sponsor of TORONTO FASHION WEEK until 2008.
During this time, ROBIN KAY worked tirelessly to bring in new sponsors and new designers.

Designers from Milan were featured over the years, causing some controversy. One of the sponsors brought in during this time was LG. A key to attracting more sponsorship was increasing consumer attendance. Tickets were sold to evening shows and parties. A buzz started to happen as the shows became a ‘fashion happening’ in the City attracting a cool, hip crowd. Efforts were put into attracting well-known society types and fashion influencers. JOE MIMRAN became Chair of the FDCC Board. Other board members introduced included Lynda Price and Lorne Gertner. Controversy began to develop around the FDCC and a petition was started to remove ROBIN KAY from her position of President of FDCC. Designers were unhappy that the FDCC was not acting as a membership-driven organization and not giving designers a say in the Shows. Shows moved from The Liberty Grand to another larger CNE venue. Media were being charged $100 to cover the shows.

December 2008,
LG TORONTO FASHION WEEK.
L’Oreal remained the beauty sponsor.
The shows moved from the CNE to a tent at Toronto’s Nathan Phillip’s Square and to later at David Pecaut Square, it’s current home.

Controversy continued to surround Robin Kay and the FDCC. The Board of Directors for the FDCC dropped from a group of 10 people to four – Robin Kay, Joe Mimran, Lorne Gertner and Lynda Price. Aside from showing in Toronto Fashion Week, designers were shut out of any decision-making at the FDCC. The FDCC stopped promoting industry membership. Promotion and advertising of consumer tickets increased. Bigger sponsors were added such as Mercedes Benz, Rowenta, etc.

2012
WORLD MASTERCARD TORONTO FASHION WEEK
In August 2012, the FDCC announced it had been sold to IMG, producers of FASHION WEEK in several cities including London, Berlin, Paris, etc.

Posted in CANADIAN DESIGNERS, CANADIAN FASHION, CANADIAN FASHION ORGANISATIONS, CANADIAN FASHION PEOPLE, CANADIAN FASHION SUPPORT SYSTEM, JAMES FOWLER | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CANADIAN FASHION MODELS: MARIA HOYT

A “SPECIAL THANKS” to BEBA HOJT / MARIA HOYT, for introducing me to the world of the CANADIAN FASHION MODEL in the 1970’s and 80’s. It is amazing for me to get to share first hand with someone who was there. The following images are certainly not all, but a great cross section.

INTERNATIONAL TOP MODELS MARIA HOYT 1972

INTERNATIONAL TOP MODELS
MARIA HOYT
1972

INTERNATIONAL TOP MODELS MARIA HOYT 1972

INTERNATIONAL TOP MODELS
MARIA HOYT
1972

THE EXPOSITOR MARIA HOYT 1972

THE EXPOSITOR
MARIA HOYT
1972

INTERNATIONAL TOP MODELS MARIA HOYT 1973

INTERNATIONAL TOP MODELS
MARIA HOYT
1973

INTERNATIONAL TOP MODELS MARIA HOYT 1973

INTERNATIONAL TOP MODELS
MARIA HOYT
1973

WEEKEND MAGAZINE MARIA HOYT  VIJU CRANE JUNE 1973

WEEKEND MAGAZINE MARIA HOYT
VIJU CRANE
JUNE 1973

WEEKEND MAGAZINE MARIA HOYT  VIJU CRANE JUNE 1973

WEEKEND MAGAZINE MARIA HOYT
VIJU CRANE
JUNE 1973

WEEKEND MAGAZINE MARIA HOYT  VIJU CRANE JUNE 1973

WEEKEND MAGAZINE MARIA HOYT
VIJU CRANE
JUNE 1973

EATONS L-R UNKNOWN, JUDY HOLMES, UNKNOWN, MARIA HOYT 1975

EATONS
L-R UNKNOWN, JUDY HOLMES, UNKNOWN, MARIA HOYT
1975

SILHOUETTE DESIRE MARIA HOYT ILLUSTRATION BY TOM BJARNASON 1975

SILHOUETTE DESIRE
MARIA HOYT
ILLUSTRATION BY TOM BJARNASON
1975

CARON INTERNATIONAL R-L CAROL LAWRENCE, MARIA HOYT 1979

CARON INTERNATIONAL
R-L CAROL LAWRENCE, MARIA HOYT 1979

CARON INTERNATIONAL L-R CAROL LAWRENCE, MARIA HOYT  1979

CARON INTERNATIONAL L-R CAROL LAWRENCE, MARIA HOYT
1979

TORONTO LIFE MARIA HOYT JULY 1980

TORONTO LIFE
MARIA HOYT
JULY 1980

TORONTO LIFE MARIA HOYT FEBRUARY 1980

TORONTO LIFE
MARIA HOYT
FEBRUARY 1980

HOMEMAKERS MAGAZINE MARIA HOYT JUNE 1980

HOMEMAKERS MAGAZINE
MARIA HOYT
JUNE 1980

MADAME AN FOYE  MARIA HOYT JUNE 1980

MADAME AN FOYE
MARIA HOYT
JUNE 1980

MADAM AN FOYER MARIA HOYT MAY 1981

MADAM AN FOYER
MARIA HOYT
MAY 1981

SHERRIDA MARIA HOYT 1981

SHERRIDA
MARIA HOYT
1981

SHERRIDA MARIA HOYT 1981

SHERRIDA
MARIA HOYT
1981

SHERRIDA MARIA HOYT 1981

SHERRIDA
MARIA HOYT
1981

HOMEMAKERS MARIA HOYT JUNE 1981

HOMEMAKERS
MARIA HOYT
JUNE 1981

SHERRIDA MARIA HOYT 1982

SHERRIDA
MARIA HOYT
1982

SHERRIDA MARIA HOYT 1982

SHERRIDA
MARIA HOYT
1982

SHERRIDA MARIA HOYT 1983

SHERRIDA
MARIA HOYT
1983

SHERRIDA MARIA HOYT 1983

SHERRIDA
MARIA HOYT
1983

VERVE MARIA HOYT SEPT OCT 1985

VERVE
MARIA HOYT
SEPT OCT 1985

HOMEMAKERS MAGAZINE MARIA HOYT JUNE 1985

HOMEMAKERS MAGAZINE
MARIA HOYT
JUNE 1985

This is the sort of thing that can only pop up in an in person meet up. An after hours private shoot with CANDIAN FASHION DESIGNER/ GERALD FRANKLIN, CANADIAN FASHION MODEL/ MARIA HOYT and CANADIAN FASHION PHOTOGRAPHER/ ANDRE GAGNE ca1981 just because they wanted to.

GERALD FRANKLIN maria hoyt andre gagne (2)

GERALD FRANKLIN maria hoyt andre gagne (3)

GERALD FRANKLIN maria hoyt andre gagne (4)

GERALD FRANKLIN maria hoyt andre gagne (5)

GERALD FRANKLIN maria hoyt andre gagne

HURRAY for the comments on CANADIAN FASHION, and a superb list of the some of the top CANADIAN FASHION DESIGNERS and CANADIAN FASHION RETAILERS.

TORONTO STAR STASIA EVASUK ca 1980

TORONTO STAR
STASIA EVASUK
ca 1980

Posted in CANADIAN FASHION MODELS, CANADIAN FASHION PEOPLE, JAMES FOWLER | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CLOTHINGCANADAFASHION: PEOPLE & WEBSITE UPDATES!

People, people meeting people (can you hear Barbra Streisand), can be an amazing thing. Meetings with people have allowed me to glean first hand information, and have been the catalyst to some new additions here on the website.

I started clipping when I was a fashion student in the late 1970’s. I began clipping more ardently and visiting the Toronto Reference Library to visit their CANADIAN FASHION DESIGNER files (collected by the late ALAN SUDDON /Fine Arts Librarian at the Toronto Reference Library and costume collector extrodinaire) in the mid 1990’s (often accompanied by my friend JUDY THEORET, librarian and fellow fact finder). I was creating my own comprehensive file, as their were only two books that covered CANADIAN FASHION DESIGNERS at the time (and still are) and as an industry player and fashion school instructor I knew there was a need for another, still is, and I was/am going to put it together. In the meantime this website was created as a holder for all I was gathering and a way of getting the info out there.

The website began with the archive of CANADIAN FASHION DESIGNERS (on the right). The list of designers, and the content in their individual files continues to grow, although much of it is has been slipped in quietly and you may not have noticed any change. Going forward I will post the additions on the blog, as I fill in the files, so that you are aware!

Beyond the designers names lies an array of alternately talented people who brought/bring these designers and their work alive. Their names are not so commonly known but I have always thought that they too deserve recognition in telling the story of CANADIAN FASHION HISTORY. I have been collecting information on many of these people and organisations all along, however I needed some sort of catalyst to bring them forward. People…

SHELLEY WICKABROD (with her late husband BERNARD MCGEE, designers of CLOTHESLINES) and I have been friends for many years, we follow each other on facebook, where for the past many months a woman by the name of BEBA HOJT has been posting images and info on CANADIAN FASHION to Shelley’s timeline. Shelley put two and two together and crossed our paths. It turns out Beba Hojt /MARIA HOYT, was a major model in the 1970’s and 80’s. We met up last week. Beba arrived with many portfolios and bags of photos and ephemera and many amazing tales of the period. For someone like me who has spent many, many hours in libraries scouring for info, this was more than a delight as it was live! Christmas, buried treasure, and a pot of gold all in one, and a catalyst to the new section CANADIAN FASHION MODELS (wearing Canadian Fashion). I will blog these before listing on the right also! People…

I previously mentioned THE CANADIAN FASHION SUPPORT SYSTEM, in a blog post on Feb 2, 2016 and at that time took a moment to say “THANK YOU” to NORMA MENEGUZZI SPALL, who I had had a delightful catch up lunch with. In later emails Norma provided me with much info, having worked with many of these organisations herself, beginning in the mid 1970’s with the CFDA. She unravelled a spider’s web of names and dates and shared some very fondly remembered anecdotes. I rather dropped the ball right after that post. I have continued to collect, but have posted or filed very little, being busy elsewhere, (see previous post CLOTHINGCANADAFASHION: UPDATE/KEN AND ME/18.06.2016 for more on that). I am now picking up the ball and excited to carry on where I left off, bringing in another new section, CANADIAN FASHION SUPPORT, which I will also blog and file.

People…

Posted in CANADIAN DESIGNERS, CANADIAN FASHION, CANADIAN FASHION MODEL, CANADIAN FASHION ORGANISATIONS, JAMES FOWLER | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

CLOTHINGCANADAFASHION: UPDATE / KEN AND ME

It is some time since I posted, I have been working on another project.

BARBIE’S BOYFRIEND KEN, Vintage KEN from 1961 – 1967, collected and curated by me (JAMES FOWLER) over the last 18 years, is now on display at the FASHION HISTORY MUSEUM in Cambridge, Ontario. It’s a great close-up look at Vintage KEN, and at the periods menswear and other ephemera, and is a piece of my own autobiography.

james invite

Oh, and there is a book (I know, personal plug) “KEN AND ME” which you can order @jamesbf8@hotmail.com!

KEN AND ME COVER WITH FRAME

If you have any enquires on this don’t hesitate to e mail me, I am always happy to talk “KEN”.

My show is teamed with Belgian/Canadian Photographer WALTER SEGERS’ show, “WHAT I DID ON MY SUMMER VACATION” a series of shots representing a chunk of WALLY’S autobiography, using Ken dolls from my collection.

Wally invite

For more on WALLY go to http://waltersegers.com

And, to top it off “TYING THE KNOT 200 YEARS OF WEDDING ATTIRE” a selection from the museums collection.

FHM

In case you were not aware of the FASHION HISTORY MUSEUM it is the lovechild of JONATHON WALFORD and KENN NORMAN, the FHM’s Co founders, and Curator and Chair, respectively.

Fashion History Logo small

For more on the FHM go to http://fashionhistorymuseum.com/index-1.html

Posted in CANADIAN MUSEUMS, JAMES FOWLER | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CANADIAN DESIGNERS: CLAIRE HADDAD

CLAIRE HADDAD, C.M.
July 17, 1924 – May 17, 2016

May she rest in peace, perfect peace…
Condolences to her loved ones.
JF

CLAIRE HADDAD

We are shocked and saddened by the sudden passing of Claire Margaret Haddad (née Bardwell) peacefully in her sleep. The second of five Bardwell sisters and predeceased by the older Vivian Tanber of Toledo (the late George Sr.), she was determined not to outlive her younger sisters. The third sister, Gladys Darah (the late Nick), also of Toledo passed away the same day. Born in Toronto and known throughout the fashion world for designing elegant, high fashion sleep and loungewear in the 1960s-80s (clairehaddad.ca), Claire was the first Canadian designer to be recognized by Women’s Wear Daily and Vogue Magazine and won numerous fashion awards. She created special designs for celebrities such as Elizabeth Taylor, Carol Burnett and Mary Tyler Moore. She was also a featured subject in publications Women of Canada, Pricetag and Northern Lights – Outstanding Canadian Women. Claire received the Order of Canada in 1979 for her contribution to Canadian fashion. Claire is predeceased by the love of her life, husband and business partner Albert, of almost 70 years. She will be deeply missed by her other two sisters Jo Abraham Scott (Bill) of Toronto and Rose Marie Chamandy-Cook (the late Bill) of Montreal, as well as her immediate family: Lynn (Duncan) McGregor, Andrea (Nicolas) Zabaneh; her adored grandchildren Reid, Lisa, Scott McGregor and Hala, Christopher Zabaneh; very special great-grandson Ian McGregor; and five godchildren. The family will receive friends at the HUMPHREY FUNERAL HOME A.W. MILES – NEWBIGGING CHAPEL, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Friday, May 20th. A funeral service will take place in the chapel on Saturday, May 21st at 12:30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations in memory of Claire would be greatly appreciated to the Albert & Claire Haddad Endowment Fund, School of Fashion Studies Seneca College or the Veteran’s Grant a Wish Fund of Sunnybrook Hospital or to a charity of your choice. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com.

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/thestar/obituary.aspx?n=claire-haddad&pid=180036440&fhid=9911

CLICK ON THE LEFT FOR CLOTHING CANADA FASHION ARCHIVES OF CLAIRE HADDAD
GO TO www.clairehaddad.ca FOR THE FAMILIES ARCHIVE OF CLAIRE HADDAD

Posted in CANADIAN DESIGNERS, CANADIAN FASHION, JAMES FOWLER | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

CANADIAN OLYMPIC TEAM UNIFORMS RIO 2016

Welcome to Rio 2016. The Canadian Athletes uniforms are ready. Dean and Dan Caten / DSquared, in conjunction with The Hudson’s Bay Company, are the CANADIAN DESIGNERS. The cut; “Athleisure”, on trend and very logical, as these really are dressed up athletes. The graphics; nothing shows up cleaner-on-camera than red, white and black. And yes the maple leaf, especially when its a large, graphic and camera friendly one! Cliché, to be sure, that is what it’s about; in a field of hundreds of athletes you want something you can recognise instantly, then click and instagram. No fuss, no muss, its Canadian, its clean and classic. BRAVO Dean and Dan, and ALL THE BEST to our Athletes.

the bay rio 2016 04 2016 2

the bay rio 2016 04 2016 3

CANADIAN OLYMPIC UNIFORMS RIO 2016 1

CANADIAN OLYMPIC UNIFORMS RIO 2016 2
On Tuesday in Toronto, Hudson’s Bay unveiled the uniforms Canadian athletes will be sporting at the upcoming Rio 2016 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Designed by Dan and Dean Caten, the Canadian duo behind Dsquared2, the Olympic uniform will be worn by 315 athletes during the opening and closing ceremonies of the Games, and is described as “an innovative mash-up of two diverse worlds: tailoring and sport.”

The 2016 “Team Canada Collection” features stylish and athletic shapes that are crafted around Canada’s most distinct motif, the maple leaf. Recalling the “striking simplicity of early Canadian Olympic uniforms,” the outfit’s main attraction is a tailored blazer designed with a windbreaker material.

On their website, Dsquared2, who also designed the uniforms for the 2010 Winter Olympic in Vancouver, writes that the jacket, “features a sartorial finish with flap pockets, gum covered snap buttons, ribbed cuffs and a bonded zip pocket on the chest.”

CANADIAN OLYMPIC UNIFORMS RIO 2016 3

CANADIAN OLYMPIC UNIFORMS RIO 2016 4

Sprinter Khamica Bingham and Field Hockey Player Matthew Sarmento

The full Rio 2016 Olympic kit includes leisurewear, jackets, pants and accessories.

“The collection captures the strength of Canada, unifying performance, patriotism and style to create a look that is iconic, modern, and most of all, passionately Canadian,” Team Canada noted in a press release after the Facebook Live reveal hosted by Jessi Cruickshank and Alexandre Despatie.

TORONTO, ONTARIO - APRIL 12:  Korey Jarvis attends the Hudson's Bay Company Launch of the Team Canada Collection For Rio 2016 at the Art Gallery of Ontario on April 12, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by GP Images/WireImage)

TORONTO, ONTARIO – APRIL 12: Korey Jarvis attends the Hudson’s Bay Company Launch of the Team Canada Collection For Rio 2016 at the Art Gallery of Ontario on April 12, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by GP Images/WireImage)

The official Team Canada replica wear, priced from $19.99 to $150 for men’s/women’s clothing and outwear, will be available at all Hudson’s Bay locations across Canada and online beginning May 4th.

The countdown to Rio is officially on!

To see more photos from the #TeamCanada Rio 2016 uniform unveiling, check out the slideshow @
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/04/13/canadian-olympic-uniforms_n_9681422.html#slide=start

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/04/13/canadian-olympic-uniforms_n_9681422.html

Posted in CANADIAN DESIGNERS, CANADIAN UNIFORMS, JAMES FOWLER | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CANADIAN FASHION ICON: JUSTIN TRUDEAU

JUSTIN TRUDEAU GQ APRIL 2016 1

JUSTIN TRUDEAU GQ APRIL 2016 3

JUSTIN TRUDEAU GQ APRIL 2016 2

Justin Trudeau has come a long way from being just a snowboarding John Mayer doppelgänger. Following in the political footsteps of his father, the younger Trudeau and IRL Disney prince was elected as Canada’s prime minister last year and, since taking office, has achieved a level of Internet-boyfriend status usually reserved for the Benedict Cumberbatches of the world (Hey Girl memes included). Maybe you heard about Trudeau’s compassionate appeal on the Syrian refugee crisis? Or you’ve seen his badass-but-not-obnoxious tattoo? The guy can explain quantum computing, for God’s sake.

The reason we’ve hopped on the Trudeau train (that presumably runs on maple syrup) is that the politician dresses better than any other world leader. It’s what earned him a place on our Most Stylish Men Alive Right Now list. Even if we’re grading on an elected-leader curve—and we are—the prime minister makes an effort to look his best whether he’s in black tie at the White House or bringing his impressive sock game to a hometown talk show. And that’s why we thought Trudeau could handle his own GQ cover:

Unfortunately, you won’t find this “lost” cover on newsstands or polybagged in your mailbox—but not because we worried American audiences wouldn’t be able to handle eyes that dreamy. With Toronto hometown hero Drake and Ryan Reynolds, a.k.a. the pride of Vancouver, taking up so much prime printed real estate already, having a third Canuck cover would have ma-a-a-aybe been overkill. Kind of like when Trudeau and Obama joined forces for bro hugs and baby-kissing.

http://www.gq.com/story/justin-trudeau-gq-cover-most-stylish-men-alive

JUSTIN TRUDEAU THE STAR APRIL 2016 1

JUSTIN TRUDEAU THE STAR APRIL 2016 2

JUSTIN TRUDEAU THE STAR APRIL 2016 3

By: Robin Levinson King Staff Reporter, Published on Wed Apr 20 2016

The editorial board of GQ magazine magazine named Prime Minister Justin Trudeau “the most stylish politician alive right now” and stuck him on the cover of their May issue.

He’s sexy, he’s suave and he’s prime minister — but is Justin Trudeau the most stylish politician in the world?

GQ seems to think so. The men’s magazine editorial board named Trudeau “the most stylish politician alive right now.”

“Justin Trudeau’s meteoric rise from political young gun to Internet superhero might have something to do with the Canadian’s Obama-like levels of chill,” the publication wrote.

To be fair, Trudeau doesn’t have much in the way of competition. U.S. President Barack Obama’s dad jeans, U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron’s polo shirts, and Russia’s Vladimir Putin’s penchant for going shirtless leave much to be desired sartorially.

But there is an undeniable je ne sais quoi about Trudeau’s sense of style, says Jeff Rustia, founder of Toronto Men’s Fashion Week.

“It all goes hand in hand. The watch, the socks, the gear, the cars, it’s all very consistent,” he said.

Rustia says Trudeau has become the ambassador for Canadian men’s fashion, embracing modern trends like slim-fitting suits, bold colours and athletic wear.

“Today, part of this whole movement of men’s fashion and men’s lifestyle is very groovy . . . it’s very fitting of his kind of fashion sense,” Rustia said.

JUSTIN TRUDEAU THE STAR APRIL 2016 4

From his striped socks to his tan shoes, Trudeau has shown that he’s not afraid of stepping out of the navy-black-charcoal palette typical of politicos.

But it’s more than just what he wears, says Michael Nguyen, general manager of Garrison Bespoke, a Toronto-based custom tailor. It’s how he wears it.

“He knows how to wear the right colours for his complexion and for the setting,” Nguyen said, noting how Trudeau gravitates towards deep blues, which seem both modern and conservative at the same time.

Having grown up in the spotlight, Trudeau has an easy confidence that makes wearing a three-piece suit seem as comfortable as a jogging suit.

“You can’t buy (that) with money,” Nguyen said.

In that regard, Trudeau seems to be taking a cue from his father, Pierre.

JUSTIN TRUDEAU THE STAR APRIL 2016 5

“He actually follows in the footsteps of his father very, very well,” Nguyen said.

Although Trudeau’s style of dress is a bit more understated than his father’s pinstripe suits, fur coats and boutonnières, Rustia says they are both icons of their time.

“Like father, like son, Justin Trudeau is on trend,” Rustia said.

Amongst the trends that Trudeau has been seen sporting, GQ seemed particularly impressed with his choice of watch, his tattoo and his wavy locks.

The IWC Regulateur watch, which retails for more than $12,000, is both sporty and formal, Rustia said.
JUSTIN TRUDEAU THE STAR APRIL 2016 6

“It’s great because Trudeau wears it for both very dressy occasions and casual occasions,” he said. And while some might think a tattoo is more appropriate on a biker than a prime minister, Rustia thinks it’s “cool” because the Haida raven design has personal significance to Trudeau. His father became an honorary member of the Haida people in 1976.

“It’s meaningful,” he said.

Although Trudeau’s long waves have since been clipped, Rustia said he misses the good old days.

“I actually liked his hair when it was a little bit longer, but I know that it made him look younger and less formal,” he said.

Rustia has one point of contention with GQ’s assessment of Trudeau’s appeal: he’s much better looking than John Mayer, he said.

“He looks like one of those classic Disney princes. With Justin, it’s the whole package.”

JUSTIN TRUDEAU THE STAR APRIL 2016 7

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2016/04/20/yes-justin-trudeau-has-earned-the-gq-title-of-most-stylish-politician.html

Posted in CANADIAN FASHION ICON, JAMES FOWLER | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

CANADIAN FASHION: UNIFORMS / THE REAL BOMB GIRLS

BOMBSHELL BEAUTIES TORONTOIST MARCH 2015 1

BOMBSHELL BEAUTIES TORONTOIST MARCH 2015 2

BOMBSHELL BEAUTIES TORONTOIST MARCH 2015 3

It’s highly unlikely that the 20,000 workers—predominantly women—of Scarborough’s General Engineering Company (GECo) munitions factory would have observed International Women’s Day each March between 1942 and 1945. The date wasn’t recognized outside communist countries until 1977. However, the employees may have appreciated its objective of recognizing the importance of women’s work in society: during the Second World War, these women filled more than 256 million munitions, making the GECo site Canada’s most industrious wartime parcel of land. As men increasingly enlisted to the armed services and the war industry grew simultaneously, women in Toronto found themselves called upon to fill the gap in production on the home front. Across Canada, the number of women involved in war production increased from 6,000 to 261,000 during the course of the war.

Conceived by the federal government’s Allied War Supplies Corporation, the GECo munitions plant operated 24 hours a day, six days a week. The 346-acre campus, located between Warden Avenue and Sinnott Road south of Eglinton, was constructed between March and October 1941. Each day for the next three and a half years, workers reported to one of 172 buildings to perform tasks that were just as important and as risky as what took place on Europe’s battlefields; they regularly handled high explosives and volatile gunpowder. To fill one type of fuse, up to 76 different operations were required, and the plant was responsible for 41 types of fuses. Remarkably, in the plant’s three years of service, there was not a single recorded fatal accident.

BOMBSHELL BEAUTIES TORONTOIST MARCH 2015 4

“Idle hands help Hilter, but he isn’t getting any help from the workers of General Engineering,” said the narrator of a 1945 promotional radio program produced by GECo. Dressed in crisp white uniforms, the women were lauded as “life-savers” by the Toronto Daily Star for their production of artillery fuses and shells. The paper reported that half of GECo’s employees had sons fighting on the front and many more had husbands, brothers, and friends serving in Europe. Working as a fuse-filler, Peggy MacKay wrote in an issue of the plant magazine, The Fusilier, that she came to GECo because she had too much time on her hands with her husband and son away.

It wasn’t only the papers and the women themselves that believed that women’s work would win the war. In May 1944, the British Army called on the Canadian suppliers to provide more ammunition following the Battle of Monte Cassino, which depleted their resources; one month later, the Canadian government requested 3,500 more women report to GECo and its sister plant in Ajax to assist with the increase in demand. “Ammunition”, it was said, “is still the vital need to speed victory and save precious lives.”

BOMBSHELL BEAUTIES TORONTOIST MARCH 2015 5

Indeed, even Canada’s allies abroad were looking to GECo as a model of efficiency in the war industries. During a 1942 visit, a delegation from the Civilian Defence Volunteer Office in Greater New York said that they were “simply amazed at what Canadian women were doing.” Writing following his visit in 1943, Major General L.H. Campbell of the U.S. War Department wrote that he was “impressed with the rapidity with which the girls worked” and that “it was most unique and enjoyable to hear them sing during their work.” Known as “the fourth arm of the service” and “the women behind the man behind the gun,” the munitions workers were praised for their efforts in ending the war. The plant was such a point of pride that movie star Mary Pickford visited in 1943 and Princess Alice, wife of Canada’s governor general Alexander Cambridge, followed a year later.

BOMBSHELL BEAUTIES TORONTOIST MARCH 2015 6

The necessity of the women’s work was reflected in their high wages and generous benefits: pay was set at a base rate of $19.60 per week (approximately $350 in today’s terms) with an annual cost-of-living bonus of 17 per cent. Employees were transported to their six daytime (or five nighttime) shifts each week by company shuttle buses that came from different locations in the city. The Munitions Workers Association, to which every employee belonged, acted like a union, bargaining for improvements to work conditions and bonuses. Among the benefits provided to GECo employees was a non-profit cafeteria that operated with the objective of providing “nutritious, healthy meals” for employees. GECo also operated a nursery for the children of its workers. This mark of a progressive workplace was all the more remarkable for its low cost: workers paid 35 cents per day for one child and 50 cents per day for two, compared with one dollar per day at other area nurseries. The Fusilier newsletters regale its readers with stories of the children’s activities.

BOMBSHELL BEAUTIES TORONTOIST MARCH 2015 7

GECo workers were diverse in their experiences and backgrounds. Among them was Dorcas Trotter, a war refugee and surviving passenger on the SS Athenia, which was torpedoed by a German submarine in 1939. Many other workers came to Canada before the war or during its early years and still had family living in war-torn nations: Greeks, Venezuelans, Russians, Chinese, Poles, Syrians, and Nigerians all worked at the plant. The December 1943 edition of The Fusilier described the experience of Christmas in both their homelands and new home, the latter of which was often absent of extended family who were still overseas.

Separated from their families, the employees of GECo found a sense of community among one another. Like many of Toronto’s 20th-century manufacturers, GECo was a place of both work and play: golf driving practice, shuffleboard, badminton, volleyball, softball, and bowling were all offered to employees on and off the campus as a way of inspiring solidarity and maintaining good spirits in the workplace. More than 200 GECo employees entered the company’s 1943 fall fair, exhibiting vintage stamps, crocheted jewellery, and knitted scarves.

BOMBSHELL BEAUTIES TORONTOIST MARCH 2015 8

The women who worked at GECo were also encouraged to participate in the annual Miss War Worker pageant, a “beauty pin-up contest,” held by several manufacturers. Winners from the company event would go on to a city-wide competition, which included representation from John Inglis and Company, Massey-Harris, and Toronto Shipbuilding Yard, and which was part of the Miss Toronto pageant. The 1943 GECo contest saw 56 women, clad in their work uniforms, compete at the company level; judges deliberated their decision for three hours before crowning Alice Newman of the high explosives division the first-place winner. Neither Alice nor her fellow GECo bombshell beauties took home the $300 first prize at the city competition, which went to Dorothy Dales, an assembly line inspector at Research Enterprises in Leaside.

The Munitions Workers Association oversaw not only company bargaining and social activities, but also invaluable war drives within the company. During the six months following the plant’s opening, the association had involved 2,000 workers in blood donation drives for the Red Cross. In the same period, the employees had also subscribed over $250,000 to the Victory Loan campaign through fundraising events that included vocalist Barry Wood of NBC’s Your Hit Parade. Industrious and generous in both material and spirit, GECo and its workers were representative of Toronto—and Canada’s—contribution to the war.

BOMBSHELL BEAUTIES TORONTOIST MARCH 2015 9

Following the war, the Canadian government decided not to raze the 172 buildings, but instead turned a number of them over to the City as postwar emergency housing. The GECo housing community had between 2,000 and 6,000 residents between 1946 and 1954. At the same time, the municipality was acquiring the surrounding property for development into what would become Canada’s famous Golden Mile of Industry. Some of the original low-rise buildings remain to the southeast of Warden and Eglinton, a physical reminder of the vital work that Toronto women performed during the Second World War.

Additional material from The Globe and Mail (November 24, 1942; May 6, 1947; October 30, 1948; January 28, 1948; February 25, 1942), Toronto Star (June 7, 1941; May 23, 1942; July 14, 1942; August 25, 1942; June 30, 1943; November 10, 1943), City of Toronto Archives, Series 1243; and Archives of Ontario, Fonds 2082.

Every Saturday, Historicist looks back at the events, places, and characters that have shaped Toronto into the city we know today.

http://torontoist.com/2015/03/historicist-scarboroughs-bombshell-bomb-girls/

Posted in CANADIAN CULTURE, CANADIAN FASHION, CANADIAN UNIFORMS, JAMES FOWLER | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

CANADIAN FASHION: CAFA AWARDS 2016

and the winners are…

cafa 2016 winners 1

CAFA 2016 winners

The Womenswear Designer of the Year Award
Greta Constantine

greta constantine facebook 09 03 2013

The Menswear Designer of the Year Award
Wings & Horns

The Swarovski Award for Emerging Talent, Fashion
UNTTLD

The Swarovski Award for Emerging Talent, Accessories
Lauren Klassen

The Accessory Designer of the Year Award
WANT Les Essentiels

The Joe Fresh Fashion Innovation Award
Frank & Oak

The Fashion Design Student Award
Hamish Thwaites

The Image Maker Award
Gabor Jurina

The International Canadian Designer of the Year Award
Jason Wu

The Stylist of the Year Award
Annie Horth

The Model of the Year Award
Herieth Paul

The Sephora Fresh Face of the Year Award
Adam Butcher

The Fashion Impact Award
Laura Siegel

The Fashion Blogger of the Year Award
The Coveteur

The Vanguard Award Presented by Hudson’s Bay
Elle Macpherson

Outstanding Achievement Award
Wayne Clarke

Posted in CANADIAN DESIGNERS, CANADIAN FASHION, CANADIAN FASHION ORGANISATIONS, JAMES FOWLER | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CANADIAN FASHION: ABORIGINAL COLLABORATION

Collaboration, not appropriation, a seemingly successful way to go, with Reg Davidson and Dahlia Drive.
go to http://www.dahliadrive.com/ to see the video and more.

twitter 11 04 2016

twitter
11 04 2016

dahlia drive collaboration 3

dahlia drive collaboration 4

Posted in CANADIAN ABORIGINAL FASHION, CANADIAN ARTISTS, CANADIAN DESIGNERS, CANADIAN FASHION, JAMES FOWLER | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment