CANADIAN DESIGNERS: SHOES / MASTER JOHN AND RAD HOURANI


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A VISIT TO THE BATA SHOE MUSEUM IN TORONTO:

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About the Bata Shoe Museum
The BSM is turning 20! Celebrating a milestone anniversary, the BSM continues to prove that ‘for every
shoe there is a story’. With an International collection of over 13,000 shoes and related artefacts, the Bata
Shoe Museum celebrates 4,500 years of footwear history in four distinctive rotating galleries. In addition
to our popular semi-permanent exhibition, ‘All About Shoes’, the Museum has three galleries for changing
exhibitions, ensuring that each visit to the museum offers a new experience. Through the creation of its
innovative exhibitions, the Museum strives to enlighten and entertain visitors of all ages. Exciting adult
and children’s programming activities and a unique gift shop complete the experience. A cultural gem in
the heart of the city, the Bata Shoe Museum is definitely for the curious! Further information is available
at www.batashoemuseum.ca.

ONE OF SEVERAL SHOWS CURRENTLY ON VIEW,
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STANDING TALL THE CURIOUS HISTORY OF MEN IN HIGH HEELS.
A VERY INTERESTING COLLECTION OF FOOTWEAR FROM THE 17TH THROUGH 21ST CENTURIES AND WITH A CANADIAN DESIGNER CONNECTION!

FROM THE 1970’S, MASTER JOHN

BATA MASTER JOHN MID 1970S

FROM 2014, RAD HOURANI

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A PODCAST RE: MASTER JOHN

BATA 3

http://www.batashoemuseum.ca/standing-tall/

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JUST SAYING: CANADIAN TEXTILES


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ONCE UPON A TIME,
CANADA HAD A TEXTILE INDUSTRY…

AMAZING CANADIAN DRY GOODS REVIEW 1893 08 PAGE 6 DETAIL 1 CANADIAN PROBLEM AMAZING

AMAZING CANADIAN DRY GOODS REVIEW 1893 08 PAGE 6 DETAIL 2 CANADIAN PROBLEM AMAZING

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CANADIAN DESIGNERS: PHILLIPPE DUBUC, RAD HOURANI, TRAVIS TADDEO


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The Fashion Insider’s Guide To Canadian Menswear: Three Quebec Designers You Need To Know

QUEBEC MENS JULY 1 2015 5

By Christian Dare

QUEBEC MENS JULY 1 2015 1

There are tons of Canadian menswear brands that have taken off south of the border and across the globe; you can pick them up at Nordstroms, Macy’s and even Barneys. To name a few: Dsquared2, Roots, Canada Goose, Herschel bags, WANT les Essentiels de la Vie, Naked & Famous. But, what do the insiders of Canadian fashion wear when they want to sport a Canadian cool brand?

Canadian fashion insiders tend to turn to one province in particular for cutting edge menswear: Quebec. This francophone province does so much to support their local talent but in true Quebecois form, they don’t scream about it. The designers simply keep working away at honing their craft and building their brands. Many of them have built cult followings across the globe… but, do you even know their names? We have rounded up the top 3 Quebec designers currently working in menswear (sadly, Denis Gagnon stopped producing a menswear line in 2013); each of them have a distinct style and cover the gamut from luxe streetwear (Travis Taddeo) to sleek modern suiting (Philippe Dubuc). And oh yeah, then there is Rad Hourani who is the first designer to ever present a unisex collection during Haute Couture Week in Paris. In the end all three designers have more in common than at first glance, they all have distinctive French je ne sais quoi to their brands: modern, sleek and edgy but with immaculate tailoring.

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Although born in Calgary, Travis Taddeo considers his adopted city of Montreal home. Taddeo launched his eponymous line almost immediately after graduating in fashion design from LaSalle College in 2008. He quickly built a cult following around his luxe street wear; this was long before it became the dominant trend we see everywhere these days. He was one of the first and is still one of the best. His collections always feature a mix of high-end jersey and sleek leathers. Don’t worry ladies, he makes a womenswear collection as well.

www.travistaddeo.com

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In 1993, Dubuc launched his line of modern minimalist menswear. His brand rests on the concept that every man needs sleek tailored suits and sportswear with a decidedly French edge. Over his almost 22 year career, Philippe has had his ups and downs in the business, including a brief time where he almost had to shutter his namesake label but thanks to collaborations with Quebec mass retailer Simons he is still going strong. Over the years he has shown in New York and In Paris but he still calls Montreal home. In 2015, Dubuc won Best Canadian Menswear designer at the CAFA awards.

www.dubucstyle.com

QUEBEC MENS JULY 1 2015 4

Rad Hourani became notable within the mainstream fashion world when he was invited to the first designer to ever present a unisex collection during Haute Couture week in Paris (2013). But this Jordanian born and Canadian raised designer has been a fashion insiders darling since his first collection in 2007. Rad was inspired to create his unisex brand when he found that he couldn’t find anything he wanted to wear in stores. He recalled that the women’s clothes were too tight, the men’s clothes were too loose, and the fabrics were always wrong. So he took on the challenge of learning the entire design process and making his own line. That’s right, he is self-taught. He currently resides in Paris but maintains a boutique in Montreal.

www.radhourani.com

http://ca.complex.com/style/2015/06/fashion-insider-guide-canadian-menswear-three-quebec-designers-you-need-to-know/rad-hourani

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JUST SAYING: GLOBAL CHAOS


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In a previous “JUST SAYING” Posted on February 21, 2015 I spoke about “CANADIAN FASHION AND SHOWING IT IN CANADA AND THE CONSTANT WHINE OF WHY SHOULD WE HAVE TO GO SOMEWHERE ELSE, WHY CAN’T WE BE WORLD FAMOUS RIGHT HERE”. I bring it up as some of the same is being said in the New York Times (article following) and I like to know that I am not alone in my thoughts.

I am adding that the “recognized” twice-annual-fashion-week which now includes; Haute Couture in Paris, Les Métiers de Chanel, shown in different cities globally, the Ready-To-Wear, shown in Paris, London, Milan and New York and the Pre-Season-collections, shown-where-they-chose-seemingly-when-they-chose…OMG…is a nightmare, for those on the inside, let alone the-customer-yes-the bottom-line-the-buck-stops-here-final-purchaser-of-the-goods.

So, why-not-Paris as the one-stop-for-all, and every other country does it’s own thing, and the editors, et al, can select from them at random, seasonly, with their now-spare-time and keep them all (and us) in the loop. They did it in the eighties, Spain being one of those chosen, we met the culture and the designers, I can still clearly recall the designer Sybilla’s clothes in Vogue, and in Bloomingdales, and even in Toronto. An introduction can go a long way.

So whether a designer choses to go-global-and-go-to-Paris, or stay-here-in-their-home-and-possibly-native-possibly-chosen-land, they could still be noticed and respected, and better yet, purchased.

Are New Fashion Capitals on the Rise?

FASHION CAPITOLS

Vanessa Friedman
JUNE 4, 2015

FASHION CAPITOLS 1 NY TIMES JUNE 4 2015

One of the thorniest questions in fashion today is brand nationality.

Tom Ford just won the Menswear Designer of the Year award from the Council of Fashion Designers of America — but his brand is based in London, and he shows on the British fashion calendar. So is his brand British, or American?

When Marques’Almeida, also based in London, won the LVMH Young Designer’s Prize last month, I called the label a British brand — even though both its designers are Portuguese — and some readers felt that was misleading. Yet again, the brand is based in and sells in Britain.

The problem is that, historically, the big four economic centers of the industry (New York, London, Paris and Milan) have been the place to be for a designer, no matter his or her nationality. If you’re not based there, or showing there, you’re, well, risking being overlooked.

Which is why a new exhibition at the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology is interesting. Global Fashion Capitals opened this week (through Nov. 14) and posits the idea that other cities are now on the rise as fashion centers, so designers have more options when it comes to work sites that match their identities. And that the process by which the New York, London, Paris and Milan axis was born is repeating itself elsewhere — like, for example, Sydney, Australia; Tokyo; Lagos, Nigeria; and Mexico City, among 19 others in the exhibition. Most of which, by the way, have their own fashion weeks. (These days every country on the map seems to have a fashion week. Some, like Brazil, have two.)

FASHION CAPITOLS 2 NY TIMES JUNE 4 2015

Could the dominance of New York, London, Paris and Milan be threatened? Will they fall? All empires do, in the end. But I’m not convinced we are there yet.

There’s a stamp of approval that comes from being part of the inner clique — in some ways, fashion is not that different from high school — and that clique is the big four.

We constantly speculate, for example, about what the first big global brand to come out of China will be. Yet every time I speak to a Chinese brand, I am told that Chinese consumers want the patina of Paris on their products, so the first thing a Chinese brand needs to do is make it in Europe.

It’s why, for example, back in the day, the Antwerp Six came to Paris to show; ditto Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons. It’s why Manish Arora, who has garments in the exhibit and who is from India, still shows in Paris.

Though we often write about the proliferation of fashion weeks, aside from the axis, they remain, in terms of influence and coverage, quite local.

To really threaten the big four, an emergent fashion capital would need not just the designer and infrastructure buy-in, but the consumer buy-in, too. I keep harping on this, but fashion, despite the fact that it likes to think it is edgy, is actually a very conservative, stuck-in-its-ways industry.

Besides, the axis has a vested interest in maintaining a lock on the industry: The economic benefits of being a fashion capital are not lost on the respective municipal and national governments. Which is, in turn, partly why other countries have woken up to the fact that being a fashion capital might be a financially and culturally beneficial idea. Follow the money.

Personally, I think it will take a drastic upheaval in the form of the show system itself — maybe its entire dissolution and reconfiguration — to redefine the meaning of a fashion capital, or subvert it entirely. In the meantime, however, the exhibition is not a bad place to start.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/05/fashion/are-new-fashion-capitals-on-the-rise.html?utm_source=Subscribers&utm_campaign=d9259cffad-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_d2191372b3-d9259cffad-417196677&_r=0

Global Fashion Capitals

Fashion & Textile History Gallery
June 2 – November 14, 2015
(EXCERPT FROM WEBPAGE)

FIT

The globalization of fashion has given rise to new fashion cities that now annually host hundreds of fashion weeks around the world. Each city’s cultural identity and particular economic, political, and social circumstances combine to elevate its designers to international attention. Global Fashion Capitals explores the history of the established fashion capitals—Paris, New York, Milan, and London—and the emergence of 16 new fashion cities.

The exhibition will also examine fashions from:
Tokyo
Antwerp
Stockholm
Berlin
St. Petersburg/Moscow
Madrid
Sydney/Melbourne
Mexico City
Sao Paolo
Istanbul
Mumbai

https://www.fitnyc.edu/24126.asp

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CANADIAN FASHION: QUEBEC / MONTREAL


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Montreal ‘cluster’ aims to put city back on fashion track

mmode 1

Eva Friede, Montreal Gazette
More from Eva Friede, Montreal Gazette
Published on: May 29, 2015
Last Updated: May 29, 2015 6:27 PM EDT

In 2008, a group of Quebec fashion industry leaders got together to brainstorm on how to compete in the global market, polish the image of Montreal as a fashion capital and get the industry out of the doldrums.

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They concluded with a wide-ranging report in 2013 and one clear message: all parties — retail, wholesale, distributors, manufacturing and design — had to work together.

It took seven years, but the message seems to have taken hold: an unprecedented group of 300 fashion insiders — everybody who is anybody in the biz, plus students, school administrators, young designers and established labels — converged on Aldo headquarters in St-Laurent Thursday to learn about the long-awaited cluster, or grappe in French

A private-public partnership, the cluster is kicking off with a planned operating annual budget of at $600,000 for the first three years and four objectives on a 10-year plan. The goals are to build a brand image for Montreal, train a workforce, offer technology support for businesses and develop export markets

In place is a brand name: mmode. Next steps: topping up the financing and hiring a director. The first $500,000 is in place: three levels of government are providing two-thirds of operating costs for the first three years, contingent on the private sector pitching in.

The public funding so far is $200,000 from the Montreal Metropolitan Community, $100,000 from the Secretariat for the metropolitan region and, from Quebec, $81,000 from the Economy, Innovation and Exports Department. In 2018, the funding ratio goes to roughly half-half.

Mmode is the ninth industry cluster to be formed in Quebec (eight are in metropolitan Montreal). Others include health care, technology and aerospace. Industry members plan strategies, then apply for government grants, which can be many millions of dollars.

In the great sunlit atrium of Aldo headquarters, presidents of corporations mingled with politicians, functionaries, students and designers before and after bilingual presentations and panel discussions. There was an acknowledgement that Montreal had lost its fashion way.

Our industry must learn from its mistakes if it wants to be here tomorrow, said François Roberge, president and CEO of La Vie en Rose and president of the cluster.

“Montreal is losing its place as a leader in Canada,” he told the crowd.

“But Montreal has what it takes to succeed: an extraordinary cultural and linguistic mix, a qualified workforce, dynamic education system, remarkable geographic situation, and an effervescent design and creative milieu.”

The fashion industry, though fragile, still accounts for 30,000 jobs in Quebec, and 45 per cent of all employment in the Canadian fashion sector. And Montreal is still the No. 3 centre in North America for clothing manufacture.

The mood in the hall was upbeat, but questions linger. Primary among them is how to move the slow boat of bureaucracy and how to put the design and manufacturing sectors together.

The issue of the big companies working with young creatives has been under discussion for years. There have been baby steps — Simons department store doing collaborations with Philippe Dubuc, for instance.

Designer Mélissa Nepton, who runs a small business in contemporary clothing and won an award that allowed her to design a collection for Target, said she hopes that designers will be integrated into the industry.

“I’m not talking about finances — I’m talking about integrating designers into projects,” she said.

Off the top of her head, she suggested that Aldo could integrate Quebec designs into its website, with looks to match shoes.

Aldo has collaborated with young designers around the world with its Aldo Rise program, but local designers have not been part of the global program.

“Of course, they look further afield, because they go for an international image,” Nepton said.

“But at the same time, they could help us on the international field.”

Said Norman Jaskolka, president of Aldo Group International: “There’s more we could do.”

“We’re proud of our roots. Design is an important aspect of our business. It’s very important for us that there is a strong local design culture,” he said.

Aldo, of course, is one of Montreal’s great success stories, with 2,400 points of sale in 95 countries and an estimated $1.8 billion in sales in 2013. It is one of four major Quebec fashion industries named by organizers — along with Gildan, Logistik Unicorp and Peerless Clothing — and one of eight companies so far that have pitched in $15,000 each to get the cluster going.

Elliot Lifson, vice-president of Peerless Clothing and president of the Canadian Apparel Federation, has been a passionate crusader and key player in the cluster from the start.

Lifson said the start of the discussions in 2008 was a great thing because the government nurtured the group, then sent it on its way. And initiatives were launched, he said: 10 companies got grants of $25,000 for technology projects.

“This is our last opportunity,” he told the crowd. “Look around the room.”

Asked to expand on what would happen if the effort fails, Lifson said, “We go back to where we were. We all paddle our own canoe.

“Peerless doesn’t need the grappe. Aldo doesn’t need the grappe. Louis Bibeau doesn’t need the grappe,” he said. (Bibeau is president of Logistik Unicorp, which makes uniforms.)

“But we have one thing. We all love this sector. And money can’t measure it. You want to leave a legacy.”

Bibeau also noted the slow process. “Considering it’s 2015, we won’t last that long in fashion. We need to do something faster,” he quipped to the crowd during a panel discussion.

Asked later how to speed up the process, he quipped again: “I don’t know. But this time it will go faster. We need the support of everybody to fix it.”

Armando Guadagno, general manager of Mondor, was optimistic.

“Now they have all the necessary levels of government, plus all the industry players left in Montreal,” Guadagno said.

“If everybody supports it as they did today, I think it’s going to work.”

He sees benefits for his company, which manufactures, markets and sells legwear from Japan to Europe. It needs help with logistics and customs regulations, for instance.

Removing duties on certain imported fabrics and yarns would be one step, he said. “We’re not protecting any industry in Canada. Why should we pay duty?”

Designer Mariouche Gagné, who has worked with the group from the start, said all four goals of the cluster would help or could have helped her in the past with her recycled fur business, Harricana.

“The image of Montreal, when you go to places like Japan, is still unclear,” Gagné said.

It is difficult to find top quality producers here, and while manufacturing is starting to come back, she said, there is huge work to do in training.

Roberge, among others, also pointed to the need to train a workforce, and said putting measures in place would be the first step.

He pointed out that LaSalle College, UQAM and Marie-Victorin fashion school representatives were there. “They know very well that they have to work in tandem with the industry,” he said.

Simon Bélanger and his partner, José-Manuel St-Jacques of UNTTLD, have won many awards and critical acclaim. They have collaborated with Éditions de Robes, a small dress shop, creating dresses that will fit and suit women’s lifestyles. But they are still waiting success in business.

“We are ambitious and want to create a brand,” Bélanger said.

The issue they face is production. Sales will follow, Bélanger believes.

“What I hope the group is going to offer us is a structure and a consciousness of what design actually is and what fashion actually is,” he said.

“We would really like to offer our services as designers. And there is always this separation between the manufacturing business and the design aspect.

“This will be bridged slowly — it might be bridged. It’s difficult for designers to be heard and felt by manufacturers because they see us as these creative creatures.”

What they said


Really, it’s about getting the people together who have a common goal, which is to make Montreal a fashion city.” – Anna Martini, president of Groupe Dynamite


We have been living a tsunami in this industry for many years. We have to value and celebrate what we do here.” – Designer Marie Saint Pierre


The cluster is going to be our voice to the world. It will help us replace ourselves as leaders here in Canada at every single level in our industry.” – Eric Wazana, president Second Clothing


Everyone talks about our sector as a setting sun. It doesn’t seem like that with this crowd here.” – Elliot Lifson, vice-president, Peerless Clothing


We are more than a rag trade.” – François Roberge, president and CEO, La Vie en Rose, and president of the mmode fashion cluster

http://montrealgazette.com/life/fashion-beauty/saving-montreal-fashion-cluster-is-launched?__lsa=5544-1842

 

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O CANADA: NURSING SISTERS / A HERITAGE MINUTE


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FROM HISTORICA CANADA:
NURSES ca WWI

Historica Canada (horourke@historicacanada.ca)

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CANADIAN DESIGNERS: MARIE SAINT PIERRE


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FASHION NOVEMBER 2014 007

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CANADIAN CONTENT: FASHION NOVEMBER 2014


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FASHION NOVEMBER 2014 001

FASHION NOVEMBER 2014 002

FASHION NOVEMBER 2014 004

FASHION NOVEMBER 2014 005

FASHION NOVEMBER 2014 006

FASHION NOVEMBER 2014 007

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CANADIANS ABROAD: IN LONDON 2010 / 1988


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INTERESTING JUXTAPOSITON: READ BOTH!

ELLE

ELLE DECEMBER 2010 IMRAM AMED

ELLE
DECEMBER 2010
IMRAM AMED

ELLE DECEMBER 2010 IMRAM AMED

ELLE
DECEMBER 2010
IMRAM AMED

GLOBE AND MAIL

MARINA STURDZA GLOBE AND MAIL SEPTEMBER 1988

MARINA STURDZA
GLOBE AND MAIL
SEPTEMBER 1988

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CANADIAN COSTUME DESIGNERS: ALEXANDER REDA


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alexander reda 1

The wardrobe department of Murdoch Mysteries with costume designer Alex Reda

alexander reda 2

Murdoch Mysteries (TV Series) (73 episodes) FROM 2008 ONGOING
NAMED AS COSTUME DESIGNER FROM 2000 ON A VARIETY OF TV MOVIES AND TV SHOWS
AND AS ASSISTANT COSTUME DESIGNER SINCE 1996

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