CANADIAN DESIGNERS ABROAD: THE WOOLMARK AWARDS / 2016 / TANYA TAYLOR

Win or lose: with Irmram Amed and Tim Blanks on the judging panel and Tanya Taylor as one of the finalists, Canadians are certainly a part of global fashion. Best of Luck to Ms. Taylor.

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By BoF Team
February 4, 2016 12:14

LONDON, United Kingdom — Today, as part of its ongoing media partnership with the International Woolmark Prize (IWP), BoF announces the judging panel for the 2015/6 IWP womenswear final. The winner of the IWP will receive AU$100,000 (about US$74,210), in addition to ongoing industry mentorship and the regional winners’ award of AU$50,000 (US$37,110) it received when selected for the final.

The panel, listed below, will meet on 12 February 2016, during New York Fashion Week, to select on an overall womenswear winner from more than 70 global nominees.
•Imran Amed, founder, chief executive and editor-in-chief, BoF
•Tim Blanks, editor-at large, BoF
•Colette Garnsey, director, Australian Wool Innovation (parent company of The Woolmark Company)
•Julie Gilhart, fashion consultant and IWP mentor
•Stuart McCullough, managing director, The Woolmark Company
•Thakoon Panichgul, chief creative officer, Thakoon
•André Leon Talley, fashion author, editor and consultant, former editor-at-large, American Vogue
•Stefano Tonchi, editor-in-chief, W magazine

In addition to a monetary prize, the winner of the IWP will have the opportunity to sell its capsule collection in a number of prestigious retailers. Representatives of the IWP’s retail partners will also serve on the judging panel. These include: Justin O’Shea, global fashion director, Mytheresa.com; Sophie Clark, general manager of womenswear, David Jones; Anita Barr, group fashion buying director, Harvey Nichols Group; Bridget Cosgrave, fashion and buying director, Boutique 1; Kenji Yamashita, general manager ladies & intimate apparel, Isetan Mitsukoshi; and Roopal Patel, senior vice president, fashion director, Saks Fifth Avenue.

The womenswear finalists for the 2015/6 prize are: J Koo (Asia); Bianca Spender (Australia); Teatum Jones (British Isles); Nanna Van Blaaderen (Europe); Taller Marmo (India, Pakistan & Middle East) and Tanya Taylor (USA).

TANYA TAYLOR WOOL MARK 2016 3

http://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/news-analysis/international-woolmark-prize-announces-judges-of-womenswear-final

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CANADIAN FASHION DESIGNERS: GROUP SHOT / FASHION / WINTER 1979

A very interesting look back at the 70’s as much as a look forward at the 1980s, CANADIAN FASHION WRITER David Livingstone adds his thoughts to those of the designers-in-the-news to send us forward. Take a look through your 2016 eyes to see what fashion dreams did come true.

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group fashion winter 1979 8 - Copy (6)

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group fashion winter 1979 18 - Copy

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group fashion winter 1979 20 - Copy (3)

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THE CANADIAN FASHION SUPPORT SYSTEM

In the previous post “CANADIAN FASHION: GROUP SHOT / CANADIAN MAGAZINE / FEBRUARY 1 1975” I mentioned the CFDA / Canadian Fashion Designers Association, and said that there would be more to come on this and other Canadian Fashion Support Organisations.

With the CAFA’s (yes CAFA, not CDFA, a completely different organisation) announcement of their 2016 nominees it seemed like this was the time to start the roll-out.

The first internationally recognized organisation was The Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne; the association of Parisian couturiers, which was founded in 1868, and was an extension of the guild system that had been in place for several centuries. Canada at that time had just celebrated its confederation in 1867, a tiny embryo that would take the following 100 years to see itself grow to gain a recognised and viable foothold among many of the worlds commercial fields. Raw goods were our trump card, we had more natural resources than almost anyone else on the planet. The finery of fashion was as far from natural resources as you could get. Although we had been able to cover ourselves from head to toe in Canadian made goods they were not necessarily of the fashionable variety. Survival was the key in a new and still developing Canada, unlike the display of excessive frippery being paraded in a very old and well established and Louis (XIV, XV, and XVI) celebrated France.

Canadian designer’s have created desirable fashion from at least the beginning of the 20th century. As their footing in Canadian society was recognized, the designers could see the benefit of a national organisation of their discipline, as seen in other countries. The Association of Canadian Couturiers (l’Association des Couturiers Canadiens) (ACC) was the first fashion organisation in Canada, formed in 1954.

The well established and government supported Chambre Syndical has continued its reign with such strength that it has been able to alter its parameters considerably as the fashion world has changed, and is still in place as the bastion some 150 years later. This has not been the case in Canada. The Association of Canadian Couturiers / ACC was disbanded in 1968, a run of less than 20 years. We have not yet to establish one governing or supporting body that has remained. Stretched across a large land with a small and quite divided population, who cannot among themselves decide what the common goal is, fashion organisations like our fashion industry, flounder, for many reasons.

Today’s post is the first in an ongoing series “THE CANADIAN FASHION SUPPORT SYSTEM” that will chronicle the various organisations that have attempted to be in support of Canadian Designers and Manufacturers.

I would like to take a moment to say “THANK YOU” to Norma Meneguzzi Spall, who, having worked with many of these organisations, beginning in the mid 1970’s with the CFDA, provided some amazing help in unravelling a spider’s web of names and dates (along with some very fondly shared anecdotes). There will be more on Norma herself, along with many other players who have supported our industry on a personal as well as professional level.

I will begin in the present, with the aforementioned CAFA, in the following post.

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CANADIAN FASHION: GROUP SHOT / CANADIAN MAGAZINE / FEBRUARY 1 1975

Leo Chevalier, Hugh Garber, Vali, Pat McDonagh, and Tom D’Auria. These 5 were designers were also members of the newly formed FDAC / Fashion Designers Association of Canada. (more on the FDAC and other Canadian fashion organisations to come…)

2 VALI PAT MCDONAGH CANADIAN MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 1 1975 2

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2 VALI PAT MCDONAGH CANADIAN MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 1 1975 4

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JUST SAYING: JUSTIN TRUDEAU

TRUDEAU MANIA ROUND 2…

HIS FATHER HAD IT, AND IT SEEMS JUSTIN DOES TOO.
THAT THING THAT MAKES THE PEOPLE SIT UP AND TAKE NOTICE.
PEOPLE BEYOND THE BORDERS OF CANADA.
“THE SLEEPY NORTHWOODS HAS SOMETHING OF INTEREST” THEY SAY.
THEY SAID THE SAME AFTER EXPO 1967.
WE HAD IT AT THE WINTER OLYMPICS IN VANCOUVER IN 2010.
WE HAVE HAD THEM IN THE PALM OF OUR HANDS SEVERAL TIMES.
BUT THEN, WE LET THEM GO.

THE 2010 OLYMPICS, THOSE ONES, IF YOU REMEMBER, WHERE OUR OWN PRIME MINISTER TOLD US WE COULD MAKE SOME NOISE.
AND WE DID, BUT ONCE OVER, WE SAT POLITELY BACK DOWN.

POLITE IS ONE THING I AM ALL FOR.
HOWEVER, THERE COMES A POINT WHERE A LITTLE, OR BETTER YET, A LOT, OF NOISE IS REQUIRED.
A LITTLE BIT OF SELF PROMOTION DOES NOT GO FAR.
SITTING BACK DOWN DOES NOT HELP.
A LOT OF SELF PROMOTION, AND OUT LOUD BACK SLAPPING, AND GETTING ON THE BANDWAGON AND STAYING THERE IS WHAT WE NEED.
NOT BLUSH AND BLANCH DEMURELY AND BOW OUT GRACEFULLY WHEN THE GOING GETS GOING.
STAND UP AND SHOUT AND REMIND THE PEOPLE OF ALL THINGS CANADIAN THAT GO ON BEYOND THE “GIVEN TIME”

WE HAVE THE POWER NOW.
WE HAVE PEOPLE AROUND THE GLOBE TELLING THE WORLD THEY ARE CANADIAN.
WE HAVE PEOPLE HERE IN CANADA TELLING THE WORLD THEY ARE CANADIAN.

CAN YOU NAME THESE GLOBAL PATRIOTS?
IF NOT, SHAME ON YOU…
YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO COME UP WITH AT LEAST A DOZEN CANADIAN FASHION DESIGNERS ABROAD ALONE…
(THIS IS A FASHION WEBSITE AFTER ALL!)

READ BACK THROUGH PREVIOUS POSTS,
LOOK AT THE SIDEBAR,
THIS IS WHAT THE WEBSITE IS ABOUT.
PROM0TION OF OUR FASHION INDUSTRY: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE.

STOP WHISPERING AND HELP ME SHOUT
O CANADA….

THEY LOVE JUSTIN AND COMPANY,
THEY CAN’T BUT HELP LOVE US TOO.

AND MAYBE, JUST MAYBE, WE WILL GROW TO LOVE ONE ANOTHER AND STAND UP AND SHOUT…
I AM CANADIAN.

JUST SAYIN’, JAMES

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OUR OWN: JUSTIN TRUDEAU IN THE NEW YORK TIMES

TRUDEAU AND CO 1

TRUDEAU AND CO 2

TRUDEAU AND CO 3

Last October, at the Louis Vuitton spring 2016 women’s fashion show on the outskirts of Paris, a male beauty in a white T-shirt, white-and-black bomber jacket and black pants waded into a blizzard of flashbulbs and cries of “Xavier!” As he took his seat between Michelle Williams and Catherine Deneuve, fashion editors tilted their heads. Who was this man? Why was he in the front row?

A quick Internet search would have told them that he was the 26-year-old filmmaker Xavier Dolan, a darling of the 2014 Cannes Film Festival and the star of a new advertising campaign for Louis Vuitton’s Ombré collection who would go on to direct Adele’s “Hello” video.

His obscurity may have something to do with the fact that he is from Canada, the country that gave the world ice hockey, the snow blower and Labatt beer.

But the notion that our neighbor to the north is a frozen cultural wasteland populated with hopelessly unstylish citizens is quickly becoming so outdated as to be almost offensive. Two weeks after the Louis Vuitton show, Justin Trudeau, the muscular, blue-eyed, social-media-savvy son of the former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, was swept into power, along with his Liberal Party, in a surprise win over Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Conservative government.

In the months since his election, Mr. Trudeau, 44, the 6-foot-2 self-described feminist, who has been a television actor, snowboarding instructor and amateur boxer, has assumed the role of world leader with a heart. In December, to the delight of the Twitterati, he welcomed a planeload of Syrian refugees with the phrase “You’re safe at home now,” while helping them into warm coats.

Vogue magazine wasted no time anointing Mr. Trudeau the “New Young Face of Canadian Politics,” noting that “the new prime minister is dashing in his blue suit and jaunty brown shoes.” Rupert Murdoch’s New York Post could not resist running a 2006 photo of a louche Mr. Trudeau, in torn bluejeans and an unbuttoned black chemise, with the headline “Hunky Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Is the JFK Jr. of Canada.”

United States citizens grimacing over a political and cultural landscape riven by a brassy real estate kingpin, endlessly recycled superheroes and reality-show dopes may be forgiven for looking northward with yearning.

As Mr. Trudeau and his wife, Sophie Grégoire-Trudeau (along with their three young children, Xavier, Ella-Grace and Hadrien), create a Canadian Camelot, they are casting light on a wider eruption already in progress.

An expanse once stereotyped as the home to square-jawed Mounties and beer-swilling “hosers” has quietly morphed into a multicultural breeding ground that has given us the Weeknd, who can’t feel his face; the director Sarah Polley, who makes films of subtle power; and the upstart fashion designer Tanya Taylor, whose creations have been worn by Michelle Obama.

The rapper Drake, of Toronto, comes in for a little ribbing now and then, but none other than Jay Z called him the Kobe Bryant of hip-hop. And even the latest album from Justin Bieber, the pride of Stratford, Ontario (population 33,430), is — gulp! — pretty terrific.

It’s all very exciting, eh? But still … Canada? The land of hyper-politeness and constant apology? The home of maple syrup, poutine, the gentle sport of curling and 10 percent of the world’s forests? The country that Spy magazine once said had “cultural Epstein-Barrness”?

As Joe Zee, 47, the Toronto-raised editor in chief of Yahoo Style, said: “There was always the feeling of being in the shadow of the U.S. For a treat we would take family trips to Niagara Falls, and I’d always want to cross the border and go to Buffalo, to go shopping! Buffalo, N.Y., was my rainbow growing up — it’s where the pot of gold was.”

“Even our national anthem sounds like a sigh: ‘O Canada,’” said the writer and editor Sarah Nicole Prickett, who was born in London, Ontario, and has written for T: The New York Times Style Magazine. “Drake, more than anyone, is the prophet who’s changing that, because, unlike a lot of talented Canadians before him, he accepts embarrassment as a cost of making big art.”

The niceness factor is something that may distinguish Canadian cultural producers. “The first month I lived in Manhattan, in the spring of 2012, I heard that I was ‘nice’ from seven people,” Ms. Prickett said. “That’s when I realized I was Canadian.” But like her confreres Grimes, Ms. Polley and the Weeknd, Ms. Prickett does not produce work that is meant to comfort.

True, Canada has delivered sultans of cool in the past. Amid the polite folk rock of Gordon Lightfoot and Anne Murray, there was the melancholy genius of Joni Mitchell, who was hip enough to win the blessing of Charles Mingus. And we would be foolish to forget the alternately sensitive and raucous Neil Young, who never met an expectation he did not defy. (“Obviously people are delighted with the change that has taken place,” Mr. Young, a California resident, said after Mr. Trudeau’s election. “It’s very positive news.”)

And let us not ignore the coolest cat in a hat, Leonard Cohen, still capable of multiple encores at 81.

Then there are the Canadian kings and queens of comedy like David Steinberg, Lorne Michaels, Mike Myers, Martin Short and Catherine O’Hara, who started out as foils to mainstream American pop culture and ended up shaping it.

Canadians have always been funny, according to the Toronto-born editor of Vanity Fair, Graydon Carter. “S.­J. Perelman used to think that Stephen Leacock was the funniest writer in the world,” Mr. Carter said, referring to the multifaceted author who moved to Canada from his native England at age 6. “And he was. The trouble is, the self-deprecation so regularly on display is often lost on Americans. Now Marty Short is the funniest person in the world — although he’s far too modest to admit it.”

Mr. Zee agrees that Canada has not become hip all at once, with the election of the mediagenic Mr. Trudeau. It is partly a dawning of self-recognition.

“We’ve always had Frank Gehry,” he said.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/01/15/style/canada-justin-trudeau-cool.html

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OUR OWN: JUSTIN TRUDEAU IN VOGUE

TRUDEAU VOGUE DECEMBER 1015

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GROUP SHOT: FLARE SEPTEMBER 1986

best of canada 1 flare september 1986

canadian fashion flare september 1986

best of canada 2 flare september 1986

LOUCAS

LOUCAS

MARILYN BROOKS

MARILYN BROOKS

JEAN CLAUDE POITRAS

JEAN CLAUDE POITRAS

COMRAGS

COMRAGS

ALFRED SUNG

ALFRED SUNG

CLOTHESLINES

CLOTHESLINES

SHELLY WALSH

SHELLY WALSH

SELINA

SELINA

PAUL CORNISH

PAUL CORNISH

BABEL

BABEL

MARIOLA MAYER

MARIOLA MAYER

ABBY KANAK

ABBY KANAK

HOAX COUTURE

HOAX COUTURE

PARACHUTE

PARACHUTE

JIM POPE

JIM POPE

MOTION

MOTION

FIONA DUNCA

FIONA DUNCA

JIM POPE

JIM POPE

BRIAN BAILEY

BRIAN BAILEY

DEAN HUTCHINSON

DEAN HUTCHINSON

dominic bellisimo flare september 1986

EDITH STRAUSS

EDITH STRAUSS

MARCELLE DANAN

MARCELLE DANAN

HILARY RADLEY

HILARY RADLEY

THALI

THALI

MICHELLINE BOUCHER

MICHELLINE BOUCHER

LEIGHTON BARRETT

LEIGHTON BARRETT

ROBERT KRIEF

ROBERT KRIEF

LE CHATEAU

LE CHATEAU

BEDO

BEDO

JEAN CLAUDE POITRAS

JEAN CLAUDE POITRAS

LORRAINE BEAUCHAMP

LORRAINE BEAUCHAMP

EDWIN BIRCH

EDWIN BIRCH

TOM D'AURIA

TOM D’AURIA

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OUR OWN: CANADIAN MINK AND A MOUNTIE / MAYFAIR SEPTEMBER 1957

mayfair september 1957

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CANADIANS ABROAD: IMRAN AMED

IMRAN AMED VANITY FAIR DECEMBER 2015 1

IMRAN AMED VANITY FAIR DECEMBER 2015 3

The Web site, which aims to bridge the sometimes cavernous gap between creative and business in fashion, has become a must-read for industry insiders.
by Derek Blasberg,

IMRAN AMED VANITY FAIR DECEMBER 2015 2

There’s fashion, which is how we describe the prevailing way people dress. And then there’s Fashion with a capital F, the international, multi-billion-dollar industry that dictates what and how people clothe themselves. Imran Amed founded the Web site Business of Fashion to link the two. “One of my first observations when I met people in the industry was this gulf in understanding between the creative side and the business side. It’s like they spoke a different language,” he says. “BoF translates business for fashion people.”

Amed, 40—who was born in Calgary, Canada, to Indian parents who had emigrated from East Africa in the 1970s—graduated from Harvard Business School in 2002. He went to work at the consulting firm McKinsey & Co. in London. But by 2006, he had started a personal blog to entertain and update his family and friends on all the amusing interactions he had with the myriad personalities he worked with at fashion houses. His motto, “Content is the most important currency,” defined his vision, and within the year his posts were capturing the attention of the fashion industry. In 2007 he was asked to teach a class, “The Business of Fashion,” at London’s famed fashion college, Central Saint Martins. (By now, he had also christened his site with this more official-sounding name.) In 2013, Amed raised a $2.5 million round of seed financing from investors, including LVMH and the original backer for Net-a-Porter. Last year, BoF launched in China, the only fashion-industry publication of its kind in the country.

“He sees the fashion business objectively and holistically, from design to investment to marketing and commerce. He understands new media very well,” says Net-a-Porter founder Natalie Massenet. He also acts as a barometer. For example, when Gucci needed a new designer last year, industry insiders looked to BoF to speculate. Same thing with Balenciaga this year.

In 2013 he entered the ranking game by inducting the first annual BoF 500, an insiders’ list of industry V.I.P.’s who often wheel and deal behind the scenes. What Amed is best known for among BoF’s 30 employees, however, is the way he runs a weekly team meeting. No one sits—that fosters idleness and chitchat. “Fashion is an industry of action, not discussion,” he says, smiling.

http://www.vanityfair.com/style/2015/11/imran-amed-business-of-fashion

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