CANADIAN MANUFACTURER: JERICO FACTORY TOUR, CANADIAN MADE APPAREL

THE NEW YORK TIMES IS TALKING ABOUT IT IN AMERICA, NOW FOR THE MEDIA TO START TALKING LOUDLY ABOUT IT HERE IN CANADA!

New York Times
American Made
U.S. Textile Plants Return, With Floors Largely Empty of People

GAFFNEY, S.C. — The old textile mills here are mostly gone now. Gaffney Manufacturing, National Textiles, Cherokee — clangorous, dusty, productive engines of the Carolinas fabric trade — fell one by one to the forces of globalization.
Just as the Carolinas benefited when manufacturing migrated first from the Cottonopolises of England to the mill towns of New England and then to here, where labor was even cheaper, they suffered in the 1990s when the textile industry mostly left the United States.
It headed to China, India, Mexico — wherever people would spool, spin and sew for a few dollars or less a day. Which is why what is happening at the old Wellstone spinning plant is so remarkable.
Drive out to the interstate, with the big peach-shaped water tower just down the highway, and you’ll find the mill up and running again. Parkdale Mills, the country’s largest buyer of raw cotton, reopened it in 2010.
Bayard Winthrop, the founder of the sweatshirt and clothing company American Giant, was at the mill one morning earlier this year to meet with his Parkdale sales representative. Just last year, Mr. Winthrop was buying fabric from a factory in India. Now, he says, it is cheaper to shop in the United States. Mr. Winthrop uses Parkdale yarn from one of its 25 American factories, and has that yarn spun into fabric about four miles from Parkdale’s Gaffney plant, at Carolina Cotton Works.
Mr. Winthrop says American manufacturing has several advantages over outsourcing. Transportation costs are a fraction of what they are overseas. Turnaround time is quicker. Most striking, labor costs — the reason all these companies fled in the first place — aren’t that much higher than overseas because the factories that survived the outsourcing wave have largely turned to automation and are employing far fewer workers.

YES, FEWER WORKERS, BUT AT LEAST IT WOULD BE HERE, MADE IN CANADA, BY CANADIANS…

I know we are on it, I see it popping up on blogs, and I see it on websites, now if we can get the big media and the Canadian government behind it,the consumer might assist in the demand…

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/20/business/us-textile-factories-return.html?pagewanted=all&_r=1&

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